Transparency not enough in healthcare pricing

Price transparencyPaul Ginsberg from the Center for Studying Health System Change testified before the Senate Finance Committee today and made a compelling argument for why transparency is not by itself going to reduce costs of care.

Ginsberg:  "Because of the current structure of most insurance plans, the average consumer is indifferent to the cost of the provider he visits, since he will likely pay a set co-pay and will never see the true cost of that provider. Ultimately, lower healthcare prices will come through changes in benefit design, even if that means data is less transparent to consumers."

See the full run-down of today's Senate hearings on pricing transparency at MedCity News.